Articles by category: CAQDAS commentary

CAQDAS commentary

Pull up your socks CAQDAS developers - we need finer tools for visual analysis

Pull up your socks CAQDAS developers - we need finer tools for visual analysis
By Christina Silver on Jul 11, 2019 at 01:18 PM in CAQDAS commentary

I was chuffed to be asked to present at the Social Research Association (SRA)’s Summer Event on 3rd July 2019 alongside Tim Highfield and Helen Lomax. My talk was called ‘digital tools for visual analysis’. This post gives an overview of some aspects of my talk.
I was last to present. Tim and Helen had already discussed the theoretical and methodological aspects of collecting and analysing images, in terms of role, representation, cultural contexts and meanings. I shifted the focus to the more practical – discussing how we can actually go about systematically analysing visual materials, using dedicated software designed for the purpose.

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Big moment for CAQDAS: QDA-XML exchange

Big moment for CAQDAS: QDA-XML exchange
By Christina Silver on Mar 18, 2019 at 05:15 PM in CAQDAS commentary

It's finally here - the ability to exchange analysed qualitative data between CAQDAS programs! Since September 2016 the developers of seven CAQDAS programs have been working together to develop an open source xml exchange standard.

Today the first version was released - a big moment in the history of CAQDAS and something that will change the way that researchers and teachers can work.

Find out more at qdasoftware.org and start exchanging CAQDAS projects !

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An ode to Kandy Woodfield’s CAQDAS contributions

An ode to Kandy Woodfield’s CAQDAS contributions
By Christina Silver on Mar 15, 2019 at 05:26 PM in CAQDAS commentary

I was shocked and deeply saddened to see a tweet from Kandy Woodfield’s account announcing her passing. As Rob stated, she was a very much loved wife, sister, auntie, sister-in-law, and cats’ mum. My thoughts and condolences are with them all, during these most difficult times. I knew Kandy in a professional context, and I very much liked her as a person – she was always kind, thoughtful, humourous, poignant and vivacious.

This post highlights just one part of Kandy’s professional life – her contribution to the field of Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data AnalysiS (CAQDAS). Together with her colleagues at The National Centre for Social Research (NatCen) Kandy developed the FrameWork Software. This work had a big impact on the field of qualitative and mixed methods social/policy research practice. It also influenced my thinking about the role of CAQDAS packages, and the relationship between technology and methodology more broadly. I hope this post goes some way to honouring Kandy’s impact in these areas.

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Calling for a revolution – we have to get rid of codes

Calling for a revolution – we have to get rid of codes
By Nicholas Woolf on Jan 17, 2019 at 06:17 PM in CAQDAS commentary

Codes are the example par excellence for our constant banging on about strategies and tactics. Reminder: strategies are what you plan to do, and tactics are how you plan to do it. When using a CAQDAS program, the tactics are very different in nature from the analytic strategies. A strategy might be to compare the men and women respondents in a study by separately conceptualizing the male responses from the female responses. The tactic to fulfil it will depend on the CAQDAS package you use, but it will involve software tools that allow you to collect together selected items of data that have been tagged or grouped by you in the software so that you can compare them on screen or in printed form. Whatever the tools in your chosen software, they will have nothing to do with the subtleties of male and female characteristics or gender issues. Instead they will involve processing data in the software to accomplish your purpose. These are two extremely different ways of thinking, but because both are called ‘coding’ you unconsciously and unhelpfully think about them in the same way. For this reason we should stop using the term ‘code’ for the strategies level of our conceptualization work.

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How many codes are needed in a qualitative analysis?

How many codes are needed in a qualitative analysis?
By Christina Silver on Feb 22, 2018 at 08:53 AM in CAQDAS commentary

There is no answer to this perennial question - not even any guidelines. You need as many codes as you need - in other words, however many are needed to capture what's going on in the data in relation to your analytic focus and research objectives. How many depends on what you're using the codes to represent, how you derive them, and how you intend to use them in the analysis. I've done substantial projects with as few as 22 codes, and others that required several hundred.

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Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS

Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS
By Christina Silver on Jan 06, 2018 at 11:28 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Professor Debra Jackson's post about the Journal of Child & Family Studies' intention to from now on only review and publish quantitative papers and the discussion it prompted on Twitter indicates how important it is for qualitative researchers to fully describe their methods and illustrate the quality of their analysis. Using dedicated CAQDAS packages to facilitate analysis won't necessarily result in higher quality outputs, but they can be used to illustrate process and rigour, and thereby have an important role to play.

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Coding is a process, not an event

Coding is a process, not an event
By Christina Silver on Nov 21, 2017 at 06:04 PM in CAQDAS commentary

What lies behind the red flag question: "I've done all my coding - now what?" In my last blogpost I considered the first likely culprit: starting to code before thinking through its purpose. But thinking about the purpose isn't enough. A second issue is the need to think about coding as an on-going process - not as a single event that gets "done" before moving on to the next event. Coding is the opportunity to repeatedly connect with our data.

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"OK I've done all my coding. What's next?" Err, didn't you plan that already?

By Christina Silver on Nov 07, 2017 at 10:47 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Yet again this week I was asked the red flag question in a CAQDAS workshop: "Coding's done. Now what?" This flags the inappropriate use of CAQDAS: no analytic planning done before plunging into helter-skelter coding. In this post and the next I'll deal with the two underlying problems: starting to code without thinking about its purpose, and thinking of coding as an event rather than a process. Taken together these can result in a mass of codes that don't lead to a thoughtful response to the research question. First: how to think about the purpose of coding.

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Using Software in Qualitative Research - A Step-by-Step Guide

Using Software in Qualitative Research - A Step-by-Step Guide
By QDAS Admin on Jul 03, 2017 at 04:55 PM in CAQDAS commentary

"extraordinarily authoritative and seriously useful, detailed yet unfailingly interesting. It brings methodological goals and software possibilities together in an accessible and lively way."

Lyn Richards, Centre for Applied Social Research, RMIT University

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Don't lose your analytic reflections: The value of writing spaces in CAQDAS packages

Don't lose your analytic reflections: The value of writing spaces in CAQDAS packages
By Christina Silver on Jun 17, 2017 at 09:30 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Writing spaces are one of the most valuable features of dedicated CAQDAS packages. But I often see projects that make little use of them. Here's why they are so potentially powerful.

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